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"The condition of the room was the way it was when he went in, no other room was offered and no attempt to clean it up was made for the duration of his appointment. No apologies offered. He received injections for a service injury during one of his tours in Iraq," Wilson continued in another tweet.

His son Christopher Wilson spent six years in the Army and was deployed to Iraq twice, according to KSL.

"I figured they would say, 'Oh, this room's not clean' and take me somewhere else, but they just kind of blew past it, didn't acknowledge it," Christopher Wilson told KSL. "They're doctors, right? So I figure one of them was going to say 'Let's go somewhere else' or 'Give us a minute to clean it,' but nothing."

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In an interview last year, Treasury Secretary Steven Munchin told Axios that job automation was not even on our radar screen, citing that the risk was still 50-100 more years away. But even if an employment apocalypse doesnt come to pass, fear of an automated future may be making Americans sicker today, according to a study published recently in the journal of Social Science and Medicine that shows a correlation between automation risk and worsened physical and mental health at the county level.

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Ed Cara

Science writer at Gizmodo and pug aficionado elsewhere

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"It shows the health of the brain was changed by playing football before the age of 12," McKee said.

"Some argue that players should play even later than 12, maybe 18, when they are adults and can make fully informed decisions," McKee said. "... The study adds to the accumulating evidence that if you're going to play football, you should do so later."

Doctors studied the brains of 246 former football players, 211 of which showed signs of CTE, a degenerative brain disorder that can cause memory loss and mood swings, among other symptoms. The study found players exhibited cognitive problems 2.4 years earlier per year they played tackle football before the age of 12. Behavioral and mood issues began 2.5 years earlier.

Some Pop Warner football leagues begin at the age of five. Based on the findings from this study, a player who began organized tackle football at age five could begin showing signs of cognitive degeneration 17-18 years before a player who began after the age of 12.

The study could continue building the groundswell of support for banning tackle football for children. Four states (Illinois, California, Maryland and New York) have considered youth tackle football bans this year.

None of the states have passed a law yet.