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Theres even a chance that all the media buzz around the issue might be making the kind of health effects the Ball State researchers are trying to learn more about worse. Essentially, as word gets around, workers in repetitive jobs know that theyre at risk of automation, and the resulting stress can bleed over into family and community life, says Emily J. Wornell, a research assistant professor with Ball States Indiana Communities Institute.

This isnt the first time researchers have linked prospective unemployment to negative health outcomes, says Sarah Burgard, an associate professor of sociology and epidemiology at University of Michigan. Burgard herself co-authored a 2009 study (which the Ball State researchers cited) that found the fear of unemployment could possibly result in worse health outcomes than actual unemployment. Theres a long line of research that backs up this theory, and Burgard pointed all way back to a 1932 study by Austrian researchers who investigated the psychological impact of a factory shutdown in a small town and the towns subsequent demise.

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Anderson added: "In our society, the diagnoses of dementia are snowballing and are taxing resources to the max. No one says playing music will be a cure for Alzheimer's disease, but it might make the symptoms more manageable, decrease the cost of care and improve a patient's quality of life."

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Playing football professionally has been linked to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain disease. But what happens to children who start the sport early, before they even turn 12?

That’s the question neuropathologist Dr. Ann McKee, whose groundbreaking work on CTE has uncovered the neurological risks of playing football, set out to answer in a new study published in the Annals of Neurology. In her team’s analysis of the brains of 211 deceased football players who had been diagnosed with CTE, along with detailed behavioral questionnaires filled out by their relatives and interviews with family members, McKee expected to find more severe signs of the condition in people who started the game young. These would be visible in more pronounced deposits of tau protein, which kills brain cells, in the brains of men who sustained hundreds — if not thousands — of extra head impacts as children.

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